Final Furlough Year

Final Furlough Year

1990-robert-cindi-joel-pandaWith our furlough years almost over, the summer before our departure was spent visiting family, while we still had the chance.  We went to the Panda restaurant in Pasadena with Uncle Bob in the years before it turned into the popular chain Panda Express.  We took one last road trip up to our Grandparents house in Sunriver, Oregon and visited Crater Lake.  And we took a trip up into Washington to meet some relatives we hadn’t met before – our Great Grandma and our Uncle Dale and Aunt Leigh.  They lived several hours north of my grandparents house on a farm in Worden, Washington.  Along the way, we stopped at a ghost town and explored the old buildings in Shaniko, Oregon.   I was tired from staying up 1990-03-crater-lake-family-1the night before, so when it came time for continuing the road trip, I asked my parents if I could take an afternoon nap in a sleeping bag in the back of the station wagon, and this still being the 1980’s, my parents obliged.  What I failed to realize was that the journey took us through the high desert of Oregon, and when I awoke several hours later covered in sweat.  I unzipped the sleeping bag and felt the cold air rush in against my now damp clothing.  As darkness settled, we stopped at a restaurant for dinner and I felt chilled to the bone sitting in the air-conditioned restaurant throughout the meal.  Heading onward, we pressed into the night and finally arrived at the long gravel road leading to my Uncle Dales farm.  Waking up the next morning, we explored the surroundings of their farm.  They had acres of land that grew a 1989-07-shaniko-hotelvariety of crops and several farm animals.  At the center of the land was an old farmhouse with several outlying buildings.  During the day, I spent time exploring around the grounds, looking at the farm animals, and riding on the back of an all-terrain-vehicle while my Uncle drove.  My parents deemed that my brother and sister were old and qualified enough to drive off on their own, and I watched as they gleefully drove off across the field, down the gravel road, and disappeared.  A few minutes later they returned looking nervous and frightened.  Apparently one of the cows did not appreciate them encroaching on their space and chased them away while by brother quickly hightailed it back to the farmhouse.  Before dinner I assisted Grandma and Aunt Leigh pick 1989-06-uncle-dales-family-oregonfresh raspberries from the rows of vines that grew next to the farmhouse and that night at dinner, we sat down at a long farm table covered in a white tablecloth and had a meal resembling a thanksgiving dinner, compete with ice cream and fresh raspberries for desert.  The next morning we hopped back in our old Oldsmobile station wagon for the drive back to my grandparents house and then the further drive back to our home in Pasadena, California.

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Seminary & Ministry

Seminary & Ministry

Before beginning his work as a pastor and then missionary, my father had completed a Masters in Theology at Dallas Theological Seminary.  In the years that followed, our missionary organization (the Christian & Missionary Alliance) had recognized my father’s gifting in teaching, language and leadership and had marked him for further study.  With the completion of our four-year term in South Korea, the C&MA felt it was time to further his studies and suggested he attend Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California.  Fuller, at the time, had one of the premier programs in Church Growth and some of the best Missiologists or teachers in missions.  The expectation was that after he had completed his doctorate, the door to return to South Korea would be open and if not, he would serve somewhere else, most likely in a seminary capacity.

My mother was also interested in furthering her studies.  Over a decade earlier, she had walked away from her dream of earning a Ph.D. in linguistics in order to marry my father.  Throughout my father’s years at seminary, as a pastor in Oklahoma and on the mission field in South Korea, Mom had quietly and faithfully served by raising us children, leading children’s groups and having women’s Bible studies.  But her desire and leading was to be a true partner in her husband’s ministry. Some people assume that living abroad alone is preparation enough for cross-cultural ministry but that is rarely the case.  Even though Mom had lived in Germany, Great Britain and Korea, had learned several languages, and had completed thirty units of Bible and Theology, she still had many lingering questions and relished the idea of being properly trained for ministry.  While the C&MA would not pay for her schooling, Fuller offered a grant of nearly matching funds to couples that wished to study and serve together, and  Mom enrolled as a student as well.

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